Immunizations

The Shelby County Health Department's Immunization Program supports preventive health efforts by promoting improved immunization coverage in the community thereby reducing the risk for vaccine-preventable diseases in all ages.  Primary services include community outreach, education, perinatal hepatitis B case management, quality monitoring of childhood vaccine coverage, and serving as a resource, coordinator, and monitor for the federal Vaccines For Children (VFC) Program.

The Health Department provides immunization records on request, if the data is available in Tennessee’s online vaccination database. To request vaccination records, call 901-222-9331 Monday – Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Vaccination records may be picked up at any of our public health clinics, which can also provide any needed vaccinations to bring children up to date on school requirements. Make an appointment at one of our public health clinics by calling 901-222-9000. Find a public health clinic near you

COVID-19 vaccinations are available in Shelby County to anyone who meets the vaccination criteria and are provided at no cost. For more information, visit https://www.shelby.community/ or call 901-222-SHOT(7468).

Vaccinations against a number of illnesses are required for children entering child care/daycare for the first time, kindergarten, 7th grade and children newly enrolled in school in Tennessee in grades other than kindergarten. Below are current vaccination requirements in Tennessee:

Requirements for children enrolling in child care, pre-school or pre-kindergarten:


  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) - age younger than 5 years only
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - age younger than 5 years only
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella - 1 dose of each, normally given together as MMR
  • Varicella - 1 dose or credible history of disease
  • Hepatitis A - 1 dose, required by 18 months of age or older

Requirements for children enrolling in kindergarten:


  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV) - final dose on or after the 4th birthday
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella - 2 doses of each, usually given together as MMR
  • Varicella - 2 doses or credible history of disease
  • Hepatitis A - total of 2 doses, spaced at least 6 - 18 months apart

Requirements for children entering 7th grade:

  • Tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis booster (Tdap) - evidence of one Tdap dose given before 7th grade entry (administered at or after age 10) is required regardless of Td history

Requirements for children newly enrolling in Tennessee schools in grades other than kindergarten:


  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV - final dose on or after the 4th birthday
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella - 2 doses of each, normally given together as MMR
  • Varicella - 2 doses or credible history of disease
  • New students entering grades other than 7th grade are not required to have Tdap. 

Requirements for full-time Tennessee college students:

  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (2 doses of each, normally given together as MMR): if born on or after January 1, 1957 only. 
  • Varicella (2 doses or credible history of disease): if born on or after January 1, 1980 only. 
  • Hepatitis B (HBV) – only for health science students expected to have patient contact (before patient contact begins). 
  • Meningococcal - At a minimum of 1 dose given at 16 years of age or greater if enrolling in public institution for the first time and under 22 years of age and living in on-campus housing; private institutions set their own requirements for this vaccine. 
For more information about required vaccinations, please refer to the Tennessee Department of Health's Immunization page

Travel Vaccinations:


Visiting another country can put you at risk for diseases that may not normally be found in the United States. Getting vaccinated against certain diseases is one of the most effective things you can do to protect your health abroad.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has extensive online information resources for travelers, including advisories and vaccination recommendations by country and region. Those resources are available here: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel. But regardless of your destination: 
  • You should be up to date on your routine vaccines. Depending on where you travel, you may come into contact with diseases that are rare in the United States. For example, although measles is rare in the United States, it is more common in other countries. Measles outbreaks happen frequently in many popular destinations in Europe and beyond—don’t go unprotected.
  • You may need other vaccines before you travel depending on your destination, your medical history, your planned activities, and other health concerns. Discuss your itinerary with your health care provider to make sure you get any destination-specific vaccines and medicines, such as yellow fever vaccine or medicine to prevent malaria.
Plan to get travel vaccinations at least one month before your departure date. Make an appointment at the Health Department's Immunization Clinic by calling 901-222-9000.
  1. Lorrie Brooks, MPH

    Deputy Administrator

  2. Immunization Clinic

    Physical Address
    814 Jefferson Avenue
    Memphis, TN 38105

    Mailing Address
    814 Jefferson Avenue
    Memphis, TN 38105

    Fax: 901-222-9320